Top 10 Pro-Fonts to spark some creativity in you

Who doesn’t like new fonts? I was searching through the net and realized that a lot of people use some really epic looking  fonts in their projects because, well… they are just plain awesome. I have compiled a list of top 10 Professional fonts to fulfil your graphic needs, Please check out and download this week and experiment with your all projects. Try making some title treatments or some logo reveals, these are bound to spark some creativity in you somewhere!

All though there have been many other most used font posts, most of them outline fonts used by the ‘not-so-well-trained’ designer. In this post I want to outline the fonts that are often used by the more ‘professional’ of designers.

Professional Fonts for Graphic Designers

1. Garamond

Although there are many versions of Garamond, the most used version today is the Adobe Garamond version (as seen above) released in 1989. Garamond is a great font for magazines, textbooks, websites and long bodies of text and was recently named the second best font (after Helvetica) by a German publication.

2. Helvetica

Helvetica is one of the most popular typefaces of all time. It was designed by Max Miedinger in 1957 for the Haas foundry of Switzerland (the name is derived from Helvetia, the Latin name for Switzerland).

The design is based on the grotesques of the late nineteenth century, but new refinements put it in the sans serif sub-category of neo-grotesque. Shortly after its introduction, the Stempel foundry purchased the original Helvetica typeface and developed a full series of weights. In the 1960s Helvetica came to the United States, where alignment standards differed; Mergenthaler Linotype copied the Stempel series and then added several new versions of the design. Helvetica is an all-purpose type design that can deliver practically any message clearly and efficiently

3. Bickham Script

Richard Lipton’s Bickham Script is a flowing, formal script typeface based on the lettering of 18th century writing masters, as rendered in the unparalleled engravings of George Bickham. This ornate script lends a signature flourish to invitations, menus, annual reports, restaurant logos, and packaging. With dozens of alternate letterforms in addition to its range of weights, Bickham Script’s personality can range from poised to extravagant.

Used mainly for formal occasions, Bickham Script  is a font which does the job well… Cameron Moll even recommended it in his article “Typefaces no one will get fired for using.” The ‘not-so-trained’ designer usually vouches for Vivaldi instead which is one of America’s most hated fonts.

4. Futura

Futura is the fully developed prototype of the twentieth century Geometric Sanserif. The form is ancient, Greek capitals being inscribed by the Cretans twenty-five hundred years ago at the time of Pythagoras in the Gortyn Code, by the Imperial Romans, notably in the tomb of the Scipios, by classical revival architects in eighteenth century London, which formed the basis for Caslon’s first sanserif typeface in 1817. Some aspects of the Geometric sanserif survived in the flood of Gothics that followed, particularly in the work of Vincent Figgins.

Futura is a font that comes up often in large displays, logos, corporate typefaces and in books where small text is needed. It is based on geometric shapes (near-perfect circles, triangles and squares) which became representative of the Bauhaus design style of 19191933. Futura has an appearance of efficiency and forwardness. Some do hate the font though.

5. Trajan

The inscription on the base of the Trajan column in Rome is an example of classic Roman letterforms, which reached their peak of refinement in the first century A.D. It is believed that the letters were first written with a brush, then carved into the stone. These forms provided the basis for this Adobe Originals typeface designed by Carol Twombly in 1989.

Trajan is an elegant typeface well-suited for display work in books, magazines, posters, and billboards and these day this font finds its way into many Hollywood movie posters and anything remotely to do with religion, law, marriage, class or the past. You can check out the flickr pool for more uses of Trajan.

6. Bodoni

Bodoni is a great font for headlines, decorative text and logos. Bodoni has a narrow underlying structure with flat, unbracketed serifs. The face has extreme contrast between thick and thin strokes, and an overall geometric construction which makes it a very aesthetic looking font.

7. Frutiger

The Frutiger font family is neither strictly geometric nor humanistic in construction; its forms are designed so that each individual character is quickly and easily recognised. Such distinctness makes it good for signage and display work and it is often used in Web 2.0 Logos.

The full family has a warmth and subtlety that have, in recent years, made it popular for the smaller scale of body text in magazines and booklets.

8. Arial

A contemporary sans serif design, Arial contains more humanist characteristics than many of its predecessors and as such is more in tune with the mood of the last decades of the twentieth century. The overall treatment of curves is softer and fuller than in most industrial-style sans serif faces. Terminal strokes are cut on the diagonal which helps to give the face a less mechanical appearance

9. Belluccia

Belluccia is dedicated to Debi’s mother, aunt, and uncle…all talented creative people who inspired her to become an artist. It was created with Brides and Invitation Designers in mind, though it is a great choice for any project seeking a custom hand lettered/flourished look.

10. Swiss 721

Many typefaces designed with a pen on paper (especially those from the 20th century) were licensed by different foundries, and were later independently digitized by them. Some special characters such as @ or the euro sign, were independently added later. Those “alternate cuts” are different digital versions of basically the same typeface design. They often vary in character set, letter proportions and kerning. Some are published under different names.

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  • http://www.thedesignwork.com Asif

    Nice list of very useful fonts.

    • http://www.saturn-tec.co.uk lava360

      thanks Asif

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