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Wonderful Astrophograph’s of 2014 and tips to be an Astrophotographer

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After viewing featured photos, first thought come to my mind how I can be an astrophotographer? or How to take astronomy photographs? but not sure what I need to follow, how it’s done and what equipment do I need? Took some pics with my digitial slr camera but all are showing just pitch black, not start, galaxy etc. Already taking pictures of the night sky is not enough need some tips and advice? Well I am sure as a beginer you are also having similar questions in your mind then let digg some articles and information for all of us to be an astrophotographer

To be very frank It’s not just the anticipation of getting an amazing shot that motivates us to shoot star trails, deep space, the moon, comets, galaxy etc but also the act of being outside in the stillness, soaking up the beauty of the night sky then reflect, show, admire, wonderful Universe. If someone from you all readers have taken some incredible Astro-Photograph’s after reading my article then I am the most happiest person on earth 😉

On these pages you’ll find videos from some of the winners of the competition explaining how they got their shot, as well as step-by-step guides from members of our Astronomy Photographer of the Year Flickr group on how to get great results, from getting the right gear through to processing

how to build Hinge Tracker

If you have a DSLR camera and are interested in astronomy, you’ve probably considered dipping a toe into the astrophotography waters. But a camera is only part of the equation — for exposures longer than a few seconds, a tracking mount is usually necessary. Unfortunately, most suitable mounts are relatively bulky, or expensive, or both. But not the hinge tracker. It costs less than $10 to build, takes less than an evening to assemble, and requires no batteries. And best of all, you can put one together even if you’ve never built anything more complicated than Ikea furniture. (Read More and check how camera can be set for astro-photography)

Please find below some links to download useful information, tips and guides for astro photography, hope you will like and find them really useful

Download the guides as PDFs: aurora | comets | deep space | the Moon | star trails

From views of the Moon and our neighbours in the solar system, to colourful depictions of the gases and galaxies which swirl in deep space. Take a look at the best images – and see the overall winner – of this year’s Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.

Please find below selected best Anatomy Photograph’s for “Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014

Martina Gardiner

It’s coming close to the selection time for Astro Photographer of the Year! While I might still be a long way off winning something I was delighted to see my photo “Stargazing at Malin Head” getting such good coverage on a couple of websites today My other photo “Storm Force Aurora at Dunluce Castle” also gets a good mention.

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Stargazing at Malin Head by Martina Gardiner

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014 has four main categories: Earth and Space, Our Solar System, Deep Space and the Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year – pictures taken by budding astronomers under the age of 16 years old. Pictured: Storm Force Aurora at Dunluce Castle by Martina Gardiner.

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Storm Force Aurora at Dunluce Castle by Martina Gardiner

Leonardo D. Ariza

From striking pictures of vast galaxies millions of light years away, to dramatic images of the night sky taken much closer to home, the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition has attracted the highest number of entries this year, with spectacular images submitted from over 50 countries across the globe. Pictured: Stellar Way by Leonardo D Ariza.

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Stellar Way by Leonardo

The winning images will be showcased in the annual free exhibition at the Royal Observatory Greenwich from 18 September 2014 to February 2015. Pictured: Purace Milky Way by Leonardo Ariza.

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Milky Way by Leonardo Ariza

Rakibul Syed

There are also three special prizes available this year: People and Space recognises the best photo featuring people in the shot; The Sir Patrick Moore Prize for Best Newcomer is awarded to the best photo by an amateur astro photographer who has taken up the hobby in the last year; and Robotic Scope acknowledges the best photo taken using one of the increasing number of computer-controlled telescopes at prime observing sites around the world, which can be accessed over the internet by members of the public. Pictured: Liberty Final by Rakibul Syed.

The bright pink dots in the picture, photographed by Rakibul Syed of Bangladesh, are new stars that have already begun shining. The striking image of an electric blue cloud of dust reveals the stormy heart of a nebula where new stars are being born.

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Liberty Final by Rakibul Syed

Maciej Winiarczyk

The final shortlist for Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014 will be announced later in the summer. Pictured: Talmine Bay by Maciej Winiarczyk. It looks like my short movie “Night of the Northern Lights” will be played to passengers on board of MV Marco Polo cruise liner sailing around north coast of Scotland in a few days. I just gave my permission for screening. Lets hope some of the guest will be back aurora hunting later in the year when dark skies return to Caithness, and fingers crossed for next awesome auroral display.

Entropy in Talmine Bay – dust to stardust. Decaying remains of schooner Reaper on Talmine Beach with Milky Way in the background. Faint aurora borealis display on the left drowning light of Andromeda Galaxy

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Talmine Bay by Maciej Winiarczyk

Ainsley Bennett

Photographers can enter online by visiting www.rmg.co.uk/astrophoto and each entrant may submit up to five images to the competition. Click or swipe through to see more of this year’s entries. Pictured: Venus Rising by Ainsley Bennett.

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Venus Rising by Ainsley Bennett

Rune Johan Engebo

Hobbyist photographer from the northern parts of Norway with a passion to capture the scenery and atmosphere of this beautiful place I am living in.
Snowy winters, flowing springs, unpredictable summers and colorful autumns. The low lit polar nights and the blizzards in between. The spectacular aurora borealis and the cinnabarine colors of the midnight sun. Aurora and the Milky Way by Rune Johan Engebo.

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Milky Way by Rune Johan Engebo

Bill Hinge

This image stitched panorama taken at Monument Valley in the morning of March 29th 2014. You can see a comparison of the light pollution being generated by Kayenta on the right versus a regular night sky on the left side of the photo. You can see Mars just above Spica from Virgo at the right edge of the photo, Saturn is in the Libra constellation and just visible right of the galactic centre of the Milky Way is the head of the Scorpius constellation “m20Trifid by Bill Hinge.”

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m20Trifid by Bill Hinge

Stephane Vetter

Skaftafell Starry Night by Stephane Vetter.

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Skaftafell Starry Night by Stephane Vetter

Bob Franke

The image uses the Hubble Palette. The SII data (sulphur) are mapped to the red channel, the Ha (hydrogen) to the green and the 0III (oxygen) data are mapped to the blue channel. IC 443, the Jellyfish Nebula, is a Galactic supernova remnant, in the constellation Gemini that occurred 8,000 years ago. IC 443 spans about 65 light-years at an estimated distance of 5,000 light-years. Exposure Details: SII 585 min. Ha 540 min. OIII 810 min

The mission of the Focal Pointe Observatory is to produce “pretty pictures.” Purists will say my images are bogus because the data is highly modified and all scientific value is lost. Well, like many other astro-artists, I just don’t care about science with my images. The closest I may get to science will probably be searching for a super nova. Shown below is a comparison of an unprocessed “scientific” and a “pretty picture” image. The two images were created from the same data “IC 443 – The Jellyfish Nebula by Bob Franke”.

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The Jellyfish Nebula by Bob Franke

Rune Johan Engebo

Hobbyist photographer from the northern parts of Norway with a passion to capture the scenery and atmosphere of this beautiful place I am living in.
Snowy winters, flowing springs, unpredictable summers and colorful autumns. The low lit polar nights and the blizzards in between. The spectacular aurora borealis and the cinnabarine colors of the midnight sun.Pan-Stars at the end of the polar night by Rune Johan Engebo.

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polar night by Rune Johan Engebo

Abhinav Singhai

Comet Lovejoy and Selfie by Abhinav Singhai. Composite of 49 pictures of 10 second (total of about 8 minutes exposure) each stacked in deep sky stacker to get the details of the comet. One picture of selfie with Comet Lovejoy blended. Picture taken near Sariska Wildlife Sanctuary

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Comet Lovejoy and Selfie by Abhinav Singhai

Written by lava360

Blogger who is Passionate about blogging to share world of design and freebies to viewers, designers, photographgers, graphic and web designers.

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